Behavioral Nutrition Archives | Dr. Stephen Gullo

Category Archives: Behavioral Nutrition

Can Dieting Reduce Your Feelings of Hunger?

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Can Dieting Reduce Your Feelings of Hunger? 

One struggle dieters frequently combat when trying to lose weight is an increased feeling of hunger that is often so strong it can derail even the most motivated person. However, a new study suggests that if you stick to a dieting plan long-term, those hunger pangs will eventually subside. Plus, the study found that if you maintain your weight loss for at least 52 weeks, it’ll be easier to maintain that weight loss long term.

Researchers at the University of Copenhagen put 20 obese people on an 8-week low-calorie diet. After that period, they put the participants on a 52-week weight maintenance track, which included meetings with a dietician and diet tracking. The researchers measured the participants’ levels of hormones associated with hunger, including ghrelin, which increases hunger, and GLP-1 and peptide YY, which suppress or regulate hunger. They took these measurements before the diet, shortly after, and at 52 weeks. After weight loss, the participants’ appetite-regulating hormone levels increased by 40% and rose even more to 65% at week 52. The hunger-inducing ghrelin levels, on the other hand, increased 23% after the weight loss. (Dieting can make you feel hungrier!) But after sticking to the maintenance plan for the rest of the year, those hunger-related hormone levels fell back to their before-weight-loss levels.

In other words, the diet and long-term focus helped the participants adapt and overcome the surge in hunger that dieting usually causes. Participants got over the “critical point” for rebounding after weight loss!

This is good news but how do you accomplish just such a feat? This study cries out for Dr. Gullo’s strategies of behavioral nutrition.

Source: http://lifehacker.com/stick-to-your-diet-for-at-least-a-year-for-potentially-1771203147

Why Liquid Diets Don’t Make Sense

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Why Liquid Diets Don’t Make Sense
There are a vast array of liquid diets, from meal replacement diet shakes to IV drips and everything in between. The extreme liquid diets require a person to consume all of her calories via liquids, while others encourage the replacement of one to two solid meals a day with a drink. Overweight dieters desperate to lose weight often resort to quick “solutions” like these fad diets. Oprah Winfrey is rumored to have used a liquid diet, and Beyonce and 50 Cent famously used the Master Cleanse to shun food for weeks. This particular type of liquid diet is also a starvation diet because it provides very few calories.

There’s nothing inherently wrong with grabbing a fruit smoothie for breakfast. If you make it with low-fat, low-sugar ingredients, it’s pretty healthy. But resorting to an all-liquids or mostly all-liquids diet to lose pounds fast almost guarantees that you’ll regain the weight once the diet is over. Fad diets like these do not teach long-term healthy eating habits, and dieters who do not remember their past food histories will simply return to the same, unhealthy eating patterns. Instead, use long-term strategies for healthy weight loss. Try food substitutions and plan out your meals and snacks in advance.

Debunking the ‘Blood Type Diet’

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Debunking the ‘Blood Type Diet’
Officially called the “Eat Right for Your Type” diet, this diet is based on the idea that people with different blood types (A, B, AB, or O) should eat different foods. The creator of the diet, a naturopathic doctor, presents the idea that blood types impact the digestive system. The idea has been thoroughly debunked by doctors and medical researchers. Dieters who follow this diet for a type O blood type are encouraged to eat poultry, fish, and lean meats, while restricting grains, legumes, and breads. Those with a type A blood type are encouraged to stick to a vegetarian diet, while those with a type B blood type should avoid lentils, wheat, and corn. People with an AB blood type are encouraged to eat primarily produce, seafood, tofu, and dairy, while avoiding chicken, beef, and pork.

There simply isn’t any scientific research to back up the diet’s claims. Legumes are an excellent source of lean protein and fiber, and there’s no reason to avoid them on a weight loss diet (or any other diet, for that matter). Forcing yourself to avoid certain foods is a surefire way to crave them even more. Instead of imposing severe dietary restrictions, use smart food substitutions and healthy meal planning techniques to achieve your weight loss goals.

The Best Weight loss exercise program in New York

The Best Weight loss exercise program in New York, NY| Is Exercise Addiction Real?

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Is Exercise Addiction Real?

Doctors are always urging their patients to get more exercise, so how is it possible to have a harmful addiction to exercise? Exercise addiction is also called compulsive exercise, obligatory exercise, and anorexia athletica. It is a behavioral addiction that is associated with the feeling that exercise is compulsory. In other words, a person no longer feels enjoyment from physical activity or a favorite sport. Instead, they feel compelled to exercise out of an obligation, rather than by choice. If the exercise addict’s schedule is interrupted and he cannot stick to his regular workout, he experiences guilt and anxiety, The Best Weight loss exercise program in New York, NY.

The Best Weight loss exercise program in New York, NY

People who exercise regularly are not necessarily addicted to it. However, if you organize your life around your workout instead of the other way around, you might have an addiction to the gym. Exercise addicts will also insist on working out despite pain, injury, fatigue, and illness. An exercise addiction is more about a sense of control than a quest for health, The Best Weight loss exercise program in New York, NY.

Overtraining to this degree can result in physical injuries. The human body simply wasn’t built to run nonstop; it needs to recover between workouts. An addiction to exercise can also lead to mental imbalance; the addict may experience depression and may even become suicidal. So how do you know if you’re at risk for an exercise addiction? Read through the checklist on this website to learn some of the risk factors.

Is Soda Really to Blame for Making You Fat?

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Is Soda Really to Blame for Making You Fat?
I’ve often talked about the dangerous side effects of drinking soda, especially for those trying to achieve lasting weight loss. Far from just being detrimental to your waistline, this sugary beverage has other harmful side effects like ruining the enamel of your teeth. Now, however, a new study suggests that soda may not be to blame for your weight gain.

David Just, professor and doctor professor and director of graduate studies in the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell University, and co-author of the new study, told The NY Post, “Diets and health campaigns aimed at reducing and preventing obesity may be off track if they hinge on demonizing specific foods.” In fact, his study did show that obese people were far more likely to binge on french fries compared to soda. And that underweight individuals were more likely to consume larger quantities of soda compares to obese people. So does this mean you can go out and get a Big Gulp if you’re trying to lose weight? Not exactly. While the study found that obese people do not consume as much soda as those who are underweight, that still is not to say that soda in any way helps weight loss or has no effect on a person’s weight. These sugary calories are still dangerous, unhealthy, and ultimately empty. If soda is your weakness, try sparkling water to help curb your cravings for the carbonated sugary stuff. It’s all about finding smart substitutions that work for you!

7 Foods to Help You Overcome Afternoon Energy Slumps

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7 Foods to Help You Overcome Afternoon Energy Slumps
You’ve hit the infamous 3 p.m. energy slump and you’re having trouble concentrating on your work. That doughnut in the break room is tempting, but it will only give you a brief sugar high, followed by yet another energy crash. Plus, those empty calories aren’t exactly diet-friendly. The best snacks to conquer fatigue combine protein and complex carbs to stabilize your blood sugar levels and provide lasting energy. It’s also important to keep in mind that eating for energy’s sake alone will add unnecessary calories to your meal plan; ask yourself whether you’re really hungry or just sleepy. If it’s the latter, trade in your planned night of bar-hopping for more sleep instead.

1. Peanut Butter
Spread this on a slice of whole grain bread or whole grain crackers for sustained energy.

2. Cottage Cheese
Add a few spoonfuls to a whole grain English muffin.

3. Greek Yogurt
Add fresh fruit for complex carbs.

4. Hummus
Dip baby carrots in it.

5. Hard-Boiled Egg
Crumble into a whole wheat pita along with veggies.

6. Edamame
Contains B-complex vitamins to help your body break down carbs into glucose for fuel.

7. Icelandic Yogurt
14 g of protein per 5.3-oz. container; Icelandic yogurt is only made with nonfat milk.

How To Avoid The Sugar Crash This Halloween

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How To Avoid The Sugar Crash This Halloween
Hyperactive kids + sugar overload = very tired parents. If you’re already dreading the inevitable sugary onslaught this year, check out our list of much healthier Halloween treats for kids. Halloween treats don’t need to include tons of sugar to be satisfying. Make healthy snacks for your Halloween party that fill up your kids’ tummies and they may not even notice the Snickers and M&M’s are missing. Remember, t’s not about food deprivation, it’s about food substitution. It’s also a good idea to plan plenty of Halloween party games to burn off some of the kids’ energy (and calories). Disguising fitness activities as games is a good way to trick your kids into becoming more physically active – just like disguising educational or speech therapy activities as games. Some fun fall activities for kids include a potato sack race, capture the ghost (instead of capture the flag), and dancing with Halloween-themed music.

When Insulin Sensitivity is a Good Thing

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People are often coached to grow a thicker skin and become less sensitive. But sensitivity can be a very good thing sometimes, particularly as it pertains to insulin. Insulin is a hormone that controls the amount of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. When you eat, your blood sugar increases. Insulin acts to store the energy for later use. A person who is insulin resistant can produce insulin, but cannot use it properly. That person’s insulin sensitivity is reduced. This condition means that the body’s cells have trouble taking in the glucose and using it. In response, the body needs a great deal more insulin than normal to process the glucose. By contrast, a person who has normal insulin sensitivity requires more moderate of insulin to process the glucose.

You might think that only diabetics need to worry about insulin, but America’s obesity epidemic means that diabetes rates are soaring. Doctors are seeing children developing type 2 diabetes, a disease that was previously called “adult-onset diabetes.” Insulin resistance is a step on the path toward type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, keeping your insulin levels steady means that you are less likely to experience blood sugar crashes that can leave you fatigued, irritable, and desperately craving a candy bar. To avoid developing insulin resistance, consume a diet rich in fiber, lean protein, and complex carbs and avoid food products with added simple sugars.

How Red Onions Can Help You Stick to Your Diet

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Red onions are, unsurprisingly, red cultivars of the onion. If that didn’t shock you, then maybe this will: the specific nutritional content of the red onion (and other onions) depends on which part of it you eat. Peeling too off many of the outer layers of this mild, sweet onion will cause it to lose nearly 75% of its anthocyanins (antioxidants) and about 20% of its quercetin (flavonoids). Which is a pity, because these components can help support cardiovascular health and prevent diseases like cancer. Red onions may also help reduce your risk of developing diabetes. They can even support joint health.

One cup of red onions contains just 64 calories, making it a much healthier way to flavor your dishes than pouring on heavy sauces. Red onions are a fat-free, cholesterol-free food. They also contain fiber, protein, folate, and vitamins B6 and C, along with lesser amounts of calcium and iron. Select dry, firm onions without blemishes. Add them to pretty much any dish imaginable, from salads to casseroles to turkey burgers.

Are Americans Delusional About Obesity?

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We like to deny a lot of things. The credit card bill can’t possibly be that high. The dog couldn’t possibly have had yet another accident on the rug. And that number on the scale has got to be lying. After all, machines malfunction all the time. Right? A study from the Institute for Health metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington says that the scale is right and you’re wrong: you really do weigh that much. The researchers found that many adults underestimate the amount that they weigh. They also found that many adults think that they’ve lost weight, when really they haven’t. Nutritionist Karen Congro wholeheartedly agrees with the study, saying that she sees it in effect on a daily basis. “There is a disconnect between perception and reality when it comes to weight. “When it comes to weight, there is a lot of magical thinking going on,”* said Congro.
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