Arise Iron Chefs
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Dieters who lose weight too quickly, those who undergo bariatric surgery, or those who cut red meat out of their diets to reduce calories and fat may be at risk for an iron deficiency. Oddly enough, obesity may lead to iron deficiency, but so can weight loss. Your best protection against iron deficiency is to eat a wide variety of healthy foods and maintain a normal weight for your height. If you’re a vegetarian, you need to consume more iron in your diet than a non-vegetarian would because iron from plant sources is not as readily absorbed by your body. Fortunately, most vegetarians shouldn’t have a problem eating plenty of iron, unless they’re the sort of vegetarian who lives on French fries and onion rings. Check out these much healthier plant-based sources of iron.

Bran Flakes (1 cup contains 8.1 mg)

Bowl of Bran Flakes
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Soybeans (1 cup of cooked soybeans contains 8.8 mg)

Fresh Soybeans
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Lentils (1 cup of cooked lentils has 6.6 mg)

Bags of Lentils
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Quinoa (1 cup of cooked quinoa has 6.3 mg)

Bowl of Quinoa
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Brussels Sprouts (1 cup of cooked Brussels sprouts has 1.9 mg)

Bowl of Brussels Sprouts
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Swiss Chard (1 cup of cooked chard has 4 mg)

Swiss Chard Salad
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Tempeh (1 cup has 4.8 mg)

Smokey Tempeh
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Dr. Gullo has offered his weight loss consulting services for over four decades to some of the most famous names in Hollywood. To get your red carpet body, check out the latest articles on Dr. Gullo's website and his revolutionary book, "The Thin Commandments." You can also subscribe to the mailing list for the latest diet foods and strategies.

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